Courtesy of Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

There have been nuisance reports of iguana in the Pelican Bay community.  Green iguanas can cause damage to residential and commercial landscape vegetation, and are often considered a nuisance by property owners. Iguanas are attracted to trees with foliage or flowers, most fruits (except citrus) and almost any vegetable. Some green iguanas cause damage to infrastructure by digging burrows that erode and collapse sidewalks, foundations, seawalls, berms and canal banks. Green iguanas may also leave droppings on docks, moored boats, seawalls, porches, decks, pool platforms and inside swimming pools. Although primarily herbivores, researchers found the remains of tree snails in the stomachs of green iguanas in Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park, suggesting that iguanas could present a threat to native and endangered species of tree snails. In Bahia Honda State Park, green iguanas have consumed nickerbean, which is a host plant of the endangered Miami Blue butterfly. As is the case with other reptiles, green iguanas can also transmit the infectious bacterium Salmonella to humans through contact with water or surfaces contaminated by their feces.

Can I remove iguanas from my property?

Green iguanas are not protected in Florida except by anti-cruelty laws and can be killed on private property year-round with landowner permission. The FWC encourages removal of green iguanas from private properties by landowners. Members of the public may also remove and kill iguanas from 22 FWC managed public lands without a license or permit under Executive Order 17-11. Captured iguanas cannot be relocated and released at other locations in Florida. Homeowners that trap iguanas on their property may be able to obtain euthanasia services from local exotic veterinarians, humane societies or animal control offices depending on the location and availability of services. For more information, view the FWC’s PowerPoint on Iguana Technical Assistance for Homeowners.

 

How can I deter iguanas from frequenting my property?

If you have an iguana frequenting your area, you can take steps to deter the animal such as modifying the habitat around your home or humanely harassing the animal. Examples of effective habitat modification and harassment include:

  • Removing plants that act as attractants
  • Filling in holes to discourage burrowing
  • Hanging wind chimes or other items that make intermittent noises
  • Hanging CDs that have reflective surfaces
  • Spraying the animals with water as a deterrent

View the FWC presentation Iguana Technical Assistance for Homeowners.